Arabic Speaking Population

Arabic Speaking Population In the World

Arabic is widely spoken around the world today. The estimated Arabic Speaking Population In The World is around 420 million with 30 different dialects. Originating from the Semitic languages, Arabic is also the language that the holy book Quran is written in, making it a primary incentive for devout foreigners to take up mastering this sacred tongue.

Arabic Speaking Population In The World: Countries by Population

The country with the highest population is Egypt (82 million). The following countries are: Algeria (39.2 million). Sudan (38 million). Iraq (33 million). Morocco (33 million). Saudi Arabia (28.2 million). Yemen (24.5 million). Syria (22.5 million). Tunisia (10.9 million). United Arab Emirates (9.3 million). Jordan (6.4 million). Libya (6.2 million). Lebanon (4.5 million). Palestine (4.1 million). Mauritania (3.9 million), Oman (3.6 million), Kuwait (3.3 million), Qatar (2.2 million) and Bahrain (1.3 million).

Influence of Arabic in other languages

The influence of Arabic is visible in languages such as Turkish, Bosnian, Persian and Hindi, but also in English with certain words like albacore and adobe that have distant Arabic origins. One of the official languages of the United Nations, Arabic speakers are constantly increasing thanks to population growth and immigration from and to the listed countries. The Arabic alphabet is said to be one of the hardest to master; however, it is one that produces the most coveted calligraphy around the world.

Arabic Speaking Geography & Major Dialect: Fusha

According to wikipedia;

Arabic has spread to a very wide geographical area with the spread of Islam since the 7th century.  With the cultural dominance of the Islamic religion, Arabic speaking population in the world spread to Balkans, Egypt and North Africa by dominating the region. Over time, a vast geography from Spain to Southeast Asia it became a superset language. Today, from the Moroccan to the Iranian border, approximately 400 million people are native speakers, but daily dialects have differences in the region. However, the seventh-century Hijaz Arabic language, the language of the Holy Quran, is accepted as Standard Arabic (Fusha) because it has remained unchanged day by day, and it is the Arabic language used by various Arabs to understand each other. Because it is the official language of the Arab states, education and press coverage is also carried out with this Standard Arabic (Fusha).


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